CHRIS GEURDS

I vaguely remember the elementary years but I do remember the influence of my mom. She knew that I had experienced enjoyment when it came to art, crafts, and music. My mom encouraged my attraction to construction paper, glue, coloring books, crayons, and colored pencils; a beginner's attraction that has grown and lasted all of my life. There is the memory of the Five and Dime store of the 60s that was visited for the supplies that my sisters and I would need to create. There is also a memory of my mom enrolling us in an arts and crafts summer class for a week. I feel very happy when I think about  how my young daughter and I shared the same arts and crafts bond from what seems like not so long ago    

Over the years, I have drawn countless works, giving many away to those who just admired a particular piece. My current drawing techniques combine a spiritual philosophy that agrees with my age and my experience with the unknown. As my pen meets the paper with most works there are no thoughts about what it is I'm about to draw. The only known factor is that eventually a shape or object(s) will appear. The various lengths of time until a concept is gained with each piece plays a part in its final stages of development. I really do get great satisfaction by designing a concept to which no prior thought toward that concept exists. The final product of the mysterious unknown developed work sometimes provides for a memorable account of "the less thought the better," especially when I actually like the piece.